Small But Perfectly Packaged

Small But Perfectly Packaged

Raisins have many health benefits and, because they have had very little processing, are as good as their fresh counterparts.

Raisins might be small but just one small box can pack a nutritional punch, because a handful of the dried grapes are rich in many nutrients including B vitamins, iron and potassium.

Not only that; they are also a great source of carbohydrates.  One small box of raisins contains 26 grams of sugar for rapid energy – the same benefits as eating sports products for improving performance.

Plus, according to the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, a small box of raisins also provides 1.6 grams of fibre which is 4% of men’s and 6% of women’s daily intake, and half of this is soluble fibre, which helps to lower cholesterol.

As a daily habit, they can also help you meet your requirement for iron, which helps carry blood around the body and also plays a role in cell function. That same small box offers 10% of men’s and 5% of women’s daily recommended intake, while also offering similar levels of potassium which is vital for the heart and healthy blood pressure levels.

Because raisins are minimally processed they retain most of the nutritional qualities of their fresh counterparts.

They are counted as fruit in terms of our five-a-day, which goes towards protecting us against a range of health problems such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes and obesity.

The health benefits of raisins include relief from constipation, acidosis, anaemia and fever. Raisins have also been known to help in attempts to gain weight in a healthy way, as well having a positive impact on eye health, dental care, and bone quality.

Raisins are irreplaceable as a healthy member of the dried fruits category. They are widely used in cooking and also added to health tonics, snacks and compact, high-energy food supplements for mountaineers, backpackers, and campers. They are also very popular with children and offer a fantastic sweet alternative to other, sugar-laden, treats.

Although dried fruit appears to have a higher level of sugar concentration than fresh this is only because portion sizes and water content aren’t taken into account in the same way. If they were, traditional dried fruits are equivalent to their fresh counterparts but with the water removed. This means 100 grapes should equate to 100 raisins rather than comparing them by weight.