DIY & Home improvement – A guide to kitchen floors

One of the most effective ways of brightening up an old kitchen is by installing new flooring. Meanwhile, if you’re getting a new kitchen in many instances you’ll probably need things underfoot to match.

Like so many home improvements, picking the perfect flooring for a kitchen isn’t as simple as some would believe. The materials on offer each boast slightly different spec in terms of lifespan and looks, so really your own needs and lifestyle, along with those of anyone else in the house, need to factor in when making any decision.

Like so many home improvements, picking the perfect flooring for a kitchen isn’t as simple as some would believe. The materials on offer each boast slightly different spec in terms of lifespan and looks, so really your own needs and lifestyle, along with those of anyone else in the house, need to factor in when making any decision.

Not to mention whatever colour scheme and design style you already have in place. Fear not, though, it’s also a fun process, providing you enjoy trying your hand at a little interior design. Nobody wants to go into anything blind, mind, so to help we’ve put together this handy guide to kitchen flooring, hopefully ensuring you’re clued up long before heading to the local DIY store.

Vinyl 

Plus points- Cheap, easy to fit yourself, easy on feet thanks to cushiness, less breakages from dropped crockery or porcelain, enormous selection of colours and styles, water and stain proof.

Negatives- Some styles can look cheap, over time wear will have a big impact with burst seams and leakages, extremely slippery when wet.

Hardwood 

Plus points- Extremely hard wearing, waterproof (if pre-finished), beautiful to look at, adds warmth

Negatives- Expensive, engineered wood only really suitable option (less susceptible to changes in humidity levels).

Porcelain tiling 

Plus points- Toughest kitchen flooring available, low maintenance, impervious to moisture, polished or unpolished available depending on your own preference, wide variety of colours and styles

Negatives- Increased chance of broken pots and pans if dropped on the floor, slippery when wet, can be expensive

Cork 

Plus points- Eco friendly, softer than wood or tile, slip-resistant, waterproof, less breakages

Negatives- Needs resealing every three years, more susceptible to scratches or stains (particularly without the aforementioned maintenance)